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Misbehaving children have been brought down to this room since the asylum opened. That statue scared them into submission. Some of them, the more disturbed ones, created a fantasy realm, a game to cope with the fear of the one they'd named the Gargoyle King. We embraced it as a therapeutic tool. And it worked because it embeds itself in the minds of the players. It makes them complacent. Focuses them.
Sister Woodhouse to Betty and Ethel[src]


Gryphons and Gargoyles also known as G&G, is a role-playing game.

Description

Gryphons and Gargoyles is a board game that as described by Hermione Lodge is targeted at impressionable developing minds. Namely, teens. The game's quests and role-playing scenarios are specifically designed to foster delusion, paranoia, and ultimately violence.

History

Gryphons and Gargoyles was created by some of the more disturbed patients who had been admitted into the Sisters of Quiet Mercy as a coping mechanism. The gargoyle statue perched at the base of the chamber scared them into submission, forcing the patients to create a fantasy realm rather than to face their fears of the one they had named the Gargoyle King. The Sisters, rather than ridding the patients of their fear, embraced the Gargoyle King and G&G as a therapeutic tool. With all that said, the game was never intended to leave the walls of the Sisters of Quiet Mercy as it is born of madness.

While it remains unclear just how the game was released into the real world, Fred Andrews, Alice Smith, FP Jones, Sierra Samuels, Hermione Gomez and Penelope Blossom came upon it while they were juniors in high school. The game eventually became a maddening obsession, which drew the six closer together, as they later dubbed themselves "The Midnight Club". They later came to discover that Tom Keller, Marty Mantle, Hiram Lodge and Darryl Doiley were also playing the game and they decided to play together. Twenty-five years later, the game reemerges.

Players

Throughout the Series

Season 3

Ben and Dilton play Gryphons and Gargoyles together while in a booth at Pop's Chock'lit Shoppe. Jughead stops by only to ask what they're playing, but before Dilton can respond, Ben tells him to shut up.[1]

RD-Caps-3x02-Fortune-and-Men's-Eyes-139-Ben

Ben kills himself

After Dilton's death and Ben's hospitalization, Ethel reveals to Betty and Jughead that she and Ben are allegedly in a relationship. They just started dating that summer and spend most of their time in Dilton's secret bunker in the woods, where they played the game together. However, it is later revealed by one of Dilton's scouts that Ben and "Princess Etheline" aren't dating in real life. When Betty and Jughead confront Ethel with this information, Ethel insists that her and Ben's love is real. Before Ethel can continue, she begins to have a seizure mid-sentence. Ben eventually wakes up from his coma, only to jump out the window to "ascend" and be with Ben in the Kingdom. [2]

Appearances

Season 3

Trivia

  • The realm in which Gryphons and Gargoyles takes place, Eldervair, is an anagram for Riverdale.
  • The name pays homage to Dungeons & Dragons, aka D&D, a famous role-playing game.

Gallery

References

  1. Aguirre-Sacasa, Roberto (writer) & Sullivan, Kevin (director) (October 10, 2018). "Chapter Thirty-Six: Labor Day". Riverdale. Season 3. Episode 1. The CW.
  2. Grassi, Michael (writer) & Woolnough, Jeff (director) (October 17, 2018). "Chapter Thirty-Seven: Fortune and Men's Eyes". Riverdale. Season 3. Episode 2. The CW.

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